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Endings + extra question 
6th-Jan-2014 04:13 pm
Drawing// Kurumi!

1.) Sometimes I'm told "泣かないの” or "言わないの" with の and the end instead of で.  I tried to search but I can't find a detailed info on what the nuance of using の instead of で is.

2.) Also, this is probably a simple question which is why I'm having trouble to find it... it's too simple haha... example: "待ってて"... what's the extra て there for?

3.) This is difficult because it's kind of figurative English, but how could you communicate the idea of "you're only winding yourself up"... like... getting more upset as a result of your own words/thinking pattern spiral.  Kind of like, "making a mountain out of a mole hill" because one keeps talking on a subject that's not really a big deal, but talk, talk, complain, complain that they really wind themselves up/get mad/upset over something that normally they wouldn't... just for the sake of getting upset and being disagreeable.  It doesn't have to be a phrase as I'm not sure one even exists, but a good simple way to say a sentence that communicates this idea clearly.

Thanks ^^

Comments 
6th-Jan-2014 10:11 am (UTC)
2) is short of 待っていて, just like 待っている is shortened to 待ってる in everyday speech.
6th-Jan-2014 10:42 am (UTC)
OH!! Duh. Thank you so much! hahahah
6th-Jan-2014 10:22 am (UTC)
1.) Sometimes I'm told "泣かないの” or "言わないの" with の and the end instead of で. I tried to search but I can't find a detailed info on what the nuance of using の instead of で is.
can you give some sentences examples for that?
I think it would be hard to give you ideas without those examples. Because I have alreasy thought of two reasons for you but I do not know which one fits your question.
言わないの - like colloquial form for the question?
As for the second question
they explain it quite well (that is not my explenation but I cannot put liks here)
To say exactly,
"待って" means "stop!" or "wait!",
and "待ってて" means "Wait here a minute."

"待って"is meaning a momentary order,
"待ってて" is meaning for a long time status.

It's almost same difference between "先食べて" and "先食べてて"

ex)
「待って」と「待ってて」
・じゃぁね、バイバイ。あ、ちょっと待って!
・トイレ行ってくるからちょっと待ってて

「食べて」「食べてて」
・先食べてみて(you try to eat first)
・トイレ行ってくるから先食べてて(I'll go restroom,so you gotta eat)


"you're only winding yourself up"
If talking about thinking too much about something to get more an more upset - it is often said as "(あなた|名前さん(ちゃん)は)考えすぎますよ" or "考えすぎるじゃないの?" as a bit softer form for that.

As for the "making a mountain out of a mole hill" - there is almost similar expression in Japanese for that too
大山鳴動鼠一匹
6th-Jan-2014 10:48 am (UTC)
Wow! Thanks for your long answer

#1 - Sorry I didn't explain in detail! I don't mean the question の but command の. My boyfriend often tells me 泣かないの or 言わないの (and other verbs too..) to tell me "don't cry/don't say that" instead of 泣かないで or 言わないで but I don't know why it's の instead of で.

#2 - Thank you! Now I understand that ^^. So, for example, how would you explain the difference between a.) 寝て and b.) 寝てて in English? a= "go to sleep" b="go to sleep.... and stay that way for a while?"

#3- Omigosh! Thank you! Both of those are perfect. It's exactly what I was asking. I didn't realize you can say almost the same phrase in Japanese too ^^. But the first one 考えすぎ is perfect too! Thank you!!!!
6th-Jan-2014 02:29 pm (UTC)
#1 well, I am not really sure, but I think that sounds like more emotional and strict as if order of a kind. I guess it even sounds like that, right?

#2 So, for example, how would you explain the difference between a.) 寝て and b.) 寝てて in English? a= "go to sleep" b="go to sleep.... and stay that way for a while?"
well, as for me, I would say it like that:
a.) 寝て - go to sleep (as request)
b.) 寝てて - sleep a while (sleep a bit) (as request too)
but my teachers say that is so and also that is not so. But their explanation with the sleep word was sort of weird because for me sleep - is already a state of doing something for a certain period of time. I guess that is easier with English because go to sleep is one time act and sleep a while - is a request for a process lol


#3 - that was the first thing that came up to my mind. still, I decided to make some search on the phrase similar to that in Japanese, as far as I know for sure that there is the one in Russian and Ukrainian (Ru: из мухи слона, Ua: робити з комара вола), so possibly and most likely there must be the one in Japanese too.

Edited at 2014-01-06 02:31 pm (UTC)
6th-Jan-2014 01:41 pm (UTC)
#1 That ending の is a short of こと. It turns the sentence into something like (if said to a boy) "Boy's don't cry."[statement] instead of "Don't cry."[request]. It has a stricter tone. Moms use this to their kids sometimes.

#3 自業自得(じごうじとく) maybe? You reap what you sow?
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